3 herbs to give to your hens.

I like giving my chickens herbs not only do they love them but it also can improve their health and create a calm environment that smells nice too. Herbs are easy to grow or can be brought from any garden store or even food shop.

  1. Lavender is one of the herbs I give to my chickens more often. I take some of the leaves and flowers to sprinkle in the nest box. Since lavender scent calms chickens I feel it will make the hens daily laying more relaxed, it also prevents flies and other insects so is great in a coop! 
    Mix the lavender and shavings together before adding it to you flocks house.
  2. Oregano is one of the most beneficial herb for your birds it’s thought to fight off salmonella, coccidiosis even the dreaded avian flu which struck at the end of last year and still is lurking about… Its also full with vitamins K and E and boosts immune systems this is why I like giving it to my growers. You also can dry herbs for their feed or as I do cut and serve.
  3. Mint is a great plant it smells good, repels rodents and can cool your chickens down. So you could grow it around the coop to keep away rats and mice and then cut to use in the coop or in your chooks wateres on hot days to cool them down. 

I hope you enjoyed this blog there are many more herbs for your chickens too and the great thing is that you can use the manure to grow them then cut them, give them more manure and the cycle continues. Why not comment what herb you flock like? I’d love to know.

How to hatch eggs under a broody hen 

So I’ve just had someone who’s about to collect some eggs from our pet flock to hatch under her broody so I thought I can make a blog post to help them and other people when they decide to satisfy there stubborn broody hen. So here’s a step to step guide…

  1. Move your hen into a “broody coop” is always better than leaving her in the coop with the other hens bothering her and you’ll need another house to keep her and her chicks once they’ve hatched away from the rest of the flock.move her off her nest at night when it’s dark. put her and her eggs in the broody coop and the next morning see if she’s still broody if she is you can either purchase some eggs from a breeder or eBay and if youve got a rooster hatch your own- it’s also best to buy or set more eggs than you need to hatch under a hen a specially if she’s a clumsy first time mum or if the eggs are posted.
  2. Make sure every morning your hen is getting up of the nest to strech her legs and have a drink and some food- it’s a good time to add some health tonic or vitamins to her water as being broody can take its toll on a hen.
  3. You’ll notice that she’ll be doing massive broody poos just remove these as they can be quite un pleasant- this is why she should come of the nest each morning to get dump it else where so it’s not making the eggs messy.
  4. On day 7-10 candle the eggs using a purpose made candeling light or torch- you should see a red dot this is the embryo there also should be veins that you may see pumping. Bad eggs such as embryos that have passed or not developed or infertile eggs will be clear with a light yellow or orange blob which is the yolk and embryos that have died produce a blood ring this will look like a red ring around the inside of the egg and you won’t be able to see any veins or a embryo.Between day 19-21 don’t take her off the nest as this is when she’ll up her humidity and sit tight ready for her eggs to pip. 
    Here’s a healthy developing embryo.
  5. Make sure to powder your birds with lice/mite powder since a hen sitting in the coop all day is easy prey for mites and lice. 
  6. Leave your hen to sit tight on the nest between day 19-21 as this is when she ups humidity ready for her babies to pop out.
  7. Feed your chicks chick crumbs these should be fed to them until they’re 8 weeks old and the mother should have mixed corn too. If you’ve got medicated chick feed to prevent cocidossis (see in blog post 3 common problems in chicks) there might be a egg withdrawal if the mother hen starts laying again. 
  8. Put pebbles or marbles in the water pots to allow the chicks to drink but not drown. 
  9. The hen will decide when’s best to say farewell to her babies this tends to start when the chicks are around  7 weeks of age. The hen can mix back into the flock when the chicks are fully feathered and when she’s fed up, but keep the young chicks in the broody coop and feed them growers pellets from 9-18 weeks of age.
  10. When your chicks are 18 weeks of age and big enough they can be re introduced carefully into the new flock. And then they can start eating layers pellets and hopefully once they’re settled lay their first eggs!
    It’s a fun and great experience for every one when a mother hen hatches her brood.

I hope your mother hen hatches a lovely brood, you’ll find it’s Nice to have chicks running about the garden. Please feel free to use the categories section to serch up specific posts via key words as theres some posts on problems in chicks aswell as using a incubator to hatch them.

3 common problems in young chicks.

It’s half way through spring and many of us expanding our flocks may have little chicks snuggled under a brooder or with a mother hen, if your wondering how to incubate eggs then search hatching chicks into the serch bar on our page. Otherwise here are 3 common problems you may need to resolve when keeping chicks…

Pasty butt

Pasty butt is common it’s when droppings stick to the down around the chicks vent. It can be caused by being overheated, too cold even stress or because of something they have eaten. The vent should not be confused with the chick’s belly button. The vent is the area on a chick where droppings and eggs exit the body. Pulling off a belly button can not only hurt the chick but get infected and even cause disembowelment. But if droppings block up a chick’s vent without being removed the chicks could die. 
    Prevention    

  1. Clean regularly to minimise loose faeces.
  2. Check chicks vents every now and then for pasty but.

    Treatment  

Its very simple just use a warm damp cloth or paper towel and remove the droppings carefully and be even more gentle not to pull the droppings or down other wise it can cause skin around the vent to rip. After you’ve dried and cleaned the area put some petroleum jelly on it to prevent any other droppings from sticking. 

As you can see the droppings stuck to the vent area therefore this is pasty butt.

Spraddle leg

 Spraddle leg is a deformity of a chick or birds legs, the feet a spread/pointing out to the sides. It makes walking hard or even impossible for the chick. if untreated it can be permanent. Although it can simply be fixed! It can be caused due to incubation problems such as the temperature going up or down or a long, difficult hatch. Injury to the legs in also a problem with another cause being a overcrowded brooder and last it could be a vitamin e deficiency. 

  Prevention  

  1. Don’t overcrowd your brooder and use paper towels or as we have found best shavings for a floor in your brooder.

  Treatment  

You will need to “brace” your chicks legs to allow the muscles to strengthen in the right position. yarn, rubber bands, tape and vetwrap can be used for a brace although it will need to be able to stay fixed in place, not restrict blood circulation when applied, doesn’t damage the skin, is easy to take off and allows the chick try walking. Now to make a brace: wrap two little pieces of The material around each of the legs just below the knee, don’t wrap too tightly. With vetwrap it sticks to itself, so no tape is used. Next cut a long pice to secure the legs together. The legs should now be underneath the chick, slightly wider compared to a normal stance but allow a slight amount of space for the chick to more them a bit. Over time the chick’s legs will become stronger and therefore slowly start to allow for more leeway inbetween the legs until it is definite that the brace is no longer needed.

As you can see a plaster is being used to brace the chicks legs together.

Coccidossiss 

Coccidiosis is a parasite which damages the wall of a chickens gut there are many different types some harmless right through to life threatening. sporoulated oocyst is digested by the chick then chemicals inside the gut start to break down the oocyst wall and it then releases the type of the coccidiosis called the sporocyst. The sporocyst changes and it occupies cells of the gut wall and they then start to replicate, more occysts are made and then they are passed out in the faeces into the brooder, run or enclosure and can infect other chickens. What is so fatal about coccidiosis is that one oocyst through its cycle can destroy thousands of cells in the gut, so think what happens if the chick is to digest lots of oocyst. It’s extremely painful for the chicks and causes the birds to stop eating, stand with a hunched posture and messy looking feathers. And damage created to the gut reduces the amount of nutrients it can absorb then the birds can loose weight and they usually may have diarrhoea.

  Prevention  

  1. Clean regularly, since the chicks are passing out oocyst in their faeces which then can infect other birds.
  2. Don’t overstock your pens, brooders etc. Birds are more likely to spread diseases rapidly if kept confined in a crowded space.

  Treatment  

Keep them in a warm and dry environment- nice and cosy and Then treat with medication, I suggest Harkers coxoid .

Here is a very bad case of coccidossiss note the hunched over chick and blood in the droppings .

I hope you know feel more confident in raising chicks and enjoy the experience if you need anymore advice take a look at the blog posts or email me via reedhorspool.theurbanhens@gmail.com and find us on Facebook at Theurbanhens or on my own Instagram page which is now full of chicken photos called r33dyr0011 thats two zeros! Oh and don’t forget to keep an eye on our page as I’m aiming for at least two educational posts every month! 🐣

Roll on 21 days!

So as you may know I’ve got my brinsea Eco egg incubator!

And now my six new macdonalds farm eggs!

 There now in the incubator so roll on the next 21 days!

marran,black arucana,black leghorn fatherd by anybof the seven cockrels running alongside their 75 hens!
welsumer,brabanter or marran or warren, fenton blue fatherd by any of the seven cockrels running along the 75 hens they keep

Broody Beyoncè 

Pure breeds especially brahmas,pekins,orpingtons and silkies. Every year Beyoncè goes broody sometimes pepper too. This year Beyoncè is broody!!! Really early in the season too!!! I think she herd me when I was at morrisons saying “if one of the hens goes broody can we hatch some eggs?” Then I came home to a grumpy faced Beyoncè on her three eggs she had laid. So when I was back down the town I got some Clarence court eggs from the supermarket. I know it’s from a farm where there aren’t any cockerels but a boy maneged to hatch a legbar egg from Clarence court and many people hatch Clarence court duck eggs. Also I love the legbars blue shells! My Nan was telling me how at a farm where her husband works they produce brown eggs on a large scale for supermarkets and within the many hens there was a cockerel roaming around there for a year as it wasn’t sexed at the hatchery.

clarence court legbar eggs
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lovely blue shells
old cotswold legbar from clarence court

I hope to purchase some eggs from south Yeo farm too.

I hope you enjoyed this blog if you did and you haven’t read our other blogs why not?

Thankyou for reading😄